Ep. 49: Amy B. Scher – How to Heal Yourself When No One Else Can

Perfectionism can be painful.

We all have an incredible healing potential – the problem is that we very often forget about it. Sometimes that is because we give our power away and just wait for others to tell us what we need to do or not to do, and other times it’s because we get so caught up in our emotional and mental turmoil that it’s hard for us to remember this. 

When we’re too hard on ourselves and expect too much of the body (especially if the body was hurt or isn’t working as it should), it can create energy blockages that can lead to slower healing and more pain.

That’s just one of the things covered in this talk with Amy B. Scher, an energy therapist whose book How to Heal Yourself When No One Else Can has been translated into 13 languages. Energy healing involves truly figuring out the deep reasons behind injuries and pain, and in this discussion, we go deep into this process.

In this episode, you’ll discover:

  • What is one of the first things that you need to look into when there is really slow healing, or if there is no healing after an injury.
  • How other traumatic experiences affect healing from an injury.
  • Why the healing process is so often frustrating and what to do about it.
  • Hands-on work: a powerful sweep technique that will change your healing journey.

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Show notes & links

The show notes are written in chronological order.

00:00 – excerpt from the episode
01:00 – intro (listen to discover a little more about your host. Martin will tell you a new lesser-known fact about Dr. Maya)

01:36
Dr. Maya Novak:
We all have an incredible healing potential – the problem is that we very often forget about it. Sometimes that is because we give our power away and just wait for others to tell us what we need to do or not to do, and other times it’s because we get so caught up in our emotional and mental turmoil that it’s hard for us to remember this.
When we’re too hard on ourselves and expect too much of the body (especially if the body was hurt or isn’t working as it should), it can create energy blockages that can lead to slower healing and more pain. I was excited to talk to Amy B Scher for the first time in 2019 when I reached out to her after reading her book How to Heal Yourself When No One Else Can. How do you actually do it? And is it possible? Please enjoy our first conversation and then head over to episodes 12 and 36 if you want even more from Amy.

02:41
Dr. Maya Novak:
In this interview, I’m joined by Amy B. Scher who is an energy therapist and best-selling author of How to Heal Yourself When No One Else Can and two other books. She’s an expert in mind-body-spirit healing and believes that we all deserve to be happy and free, which may not always be easy to achieve, but it’s always possible. Amy speaks from her own experience, because she healed herself, as she says from having pretty much every imaginable condition under the sun. Now she uses energy therapy techniques in her down to earth healing approach to help those experiencing emotional and physical challenges to move on and heal permanently and completely. Amy, thank you so much for being here.

03:23
Amy B. Scher:
Thank you so much for having me here. It’s a delight.

03:26
Dr. Maya Novak:
I’m super excited about our conversation because I know it’s going to help so many people around the world. So before we go into the juicy part, can you share a bit about yourself? When and why did you become interested in energy healing?

03:42
Amy B. Scher:
Yes. So, first of all, I have to think if there’s anyone listening that is like I once was, I never thought I would have any interest in energy healing. But, my path, my life’s path sort of took me down a very windy wiggly road and here I am. So I struggled a lot with various conditions like I say. I feel like I had every condition under the sun. I had something called chronic Lyme disease, which sort of ravaged my entire body. Lyme disease is something you get when you are bitten by a tick and the tick transfers the bacteria that causes Lyme disease. Now, if you catch it very early on, antibiotics are usually a really great cure. But for many people - many, many people – including myself, it wasn’t caught early on because it’s hard to diagnose and I ended up with a chronic version of it. I also had autoimmune diseases. I had neuropathy, which is nerve damage in the body. I had thyroid problems. I had kind of everything under the sun. This was when I was in my early 20s; I’m going to be 40 now. I went to every doctor. I went – as we all do when don’t feel good – usually our first reaction is to go to a doctor and I was sort of doctor hopping and nobody could figure out what was wrong me with. Eventually, I was finally diagnosed with Lyme disease, which didn’t really make any of the other diseases or diagnoses go away, but doctors said I think this why you’re having all of these problems. I thought oh good, I finally have a diagnosis, and a real one where they know this is what’s causing the problems. I went forward with the treatment and I did a very long course of antibiotics and many supplements to help support my body and nothing worked like it should. For time periods, I was bedridden. I was in horrible pain. I was on narcotic pain medication. Eventually, I took this leap of faith and went to India – to Delhi, India to get an experimental stem cell transplant to help repair all of my organs, nerves, muscles, and glands from what this bacteria did to me. I went to India and I got this treatment, this stem cell treatment and felt so great for a while, for about a year, and then I started to slip back again. It was at that point where I was sort of out of money. I was frustrated, disgusted, all of the things we can probably all relate in one way or another, that I sort of took a pause and a deep breath and realized that I was the only common denominator in all of these various illnesses that I had had now over a decade, basically. I, thankfully, was out of money to keep – I had fundraised and my family had helped me and I didn’t have any more money to try these various treatments that aren’t covered by insurance. That’s when I really turned inward and kind of said okay, what inside of me – not that it was my fault – but what inside of me could be contributing to this. It sort of opened up this whole new world for me about some unhealthy emotional patterns I had, like always wanting everybody to be happy with me, being a perfectionist, worrying, and really the ultimate sort of problem I had – I felt from an emotional standpoint – was really suppressing my emotions. I was never comfortable expressing my emotions. I was that person who was always fine and always relaxed, except not on the inside. That was a turning point for me where I was like I have to deal with some of this emotional stuff, and energy therapy or energy healing or these energy modalities was the way that I learned to release this old emotional energy from the body. I had been to therapy before. My dad was a therapist, so I had had many years of conventional more traditional behavioral therapy, talk therapy, however you want to say it. Finally, it was like okay, I’ve got to do something else. So that is how I ended up kind of opening up to learning about well, we all have an energy body that directly interacts with our physical body and you can’t just heal the physical body, you have to work from the mind-body-spirit standpoint. I wasn’t a person who thought I would be on board with something like that because I am very science minded and I like tests, and I’m pretty black and white. But when you’re that sick and nothing’s working, you tend to just by a process of elimination have to be open-minded and look at things you normally wouldn’t.

08:19
Dr. Maya Novak:
This is great. I know that so many people can relate to that diagnosis hunting. You’re just trying to figure it out, or get someone else to tell you what is wrong with you. Until you step inside of yourself and really discover what is happening, just going from doctor to doctor to doctor might not be enough.

08:42
Amy B. Scher:
Yes.

08:42
Dr. Maya Novak:
That’s why I’m so excited about this conversation because you have a lot of personal experience, but also professional experience with your clients that you are helping. What is, in your opinion, the first thing - or maybe one of the first things - that we need to look into when there is really slow healing, or if there is no healing after an injury?

09:07
Amy B. Scher:
So with really slow healing or no healing, I believe whether it’s an injury or a chronic illness, or whatever it may be that there could possibly be some emotional blocks. What an emotional block is, is some unhealthy emotional pattern or energy that’s actually causing a stress on your body so that’s it’s not in full healing mode. This never means that you shouldn’t go to a doctor, or that you should discount natural medicine or traditional medicine. This just means that when you have an injury you need to look beyond just the physical injury. There are a lot of things that go into creating an injury and there are a lot of things that go into healing an injury. I think that sometimes – and I was one of these people, so I’m happy to say it – when we get so defensive about we didn’t do anything. We had this accident or injury, or it’s not our fault. I was bitten by a tick that transferred to me a bacteria that gave me a disease. So it’s a similar situation, but I spent so long being mad that my life was ruined by this tick that I wasn’t looking at my part. The only thing that did was do a disservice to me. That just wasn’t helping me. So I think with an injury that’s not healing, or healing very slowly, it’s always a good idea, no matter what your current medical or natural protocol is, to look at how you can improve the environment, the healing environment, which is your body and your emotional body to support the healing, to help expedite the healing. Again, that doesn’t mean it’s your fault if you’re not healing. But when we get so defensive about feeling like we’re being blamed or it’s my fault - it’s just not worth being defensive about because if we can open ourselves up to how did we play a part in this, even sometimes unknowingly, and most of the time unknowingly, then we can open ourselves up to a new positive healing experience.

11:06
Dr. Maya Novak:
Do you think that injuries, or any of these types of situations, that they happen for a reason?

11:13
Amy B. Scher:
I do. I’m sort of like of two camps because I am one of those people who believes everything happens for a reason in my own life. But then sometimes I think dwelling on what the reason is can be detrimental because it doesn’t make sense until way later. So what I tell my clients is sometimes stuff just happens. It’s like we don’t need to analyze why everything happened. Now, being many years – having all my healing behind me and being healthy for many years, I can totally see why all of it happened. The people I met along the way, the things I learned, just everything. Like I would never ever, ever give it back and it was the worst 10 years I could imagine someone living through. So now I get it, but in the moment I don’t know if believing it happened for a reason helps. So I would say to people if that’s a helpful thought, then yes, and I do personally believe it’s true. But if it’s not, it’s a hard push to try to make yourself feel better in that way. Sometimes we do feel better if we just feel like maybe this happened for a reason but I don’t get it and I don’t need to try to figure out why right now.

12:22
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes. The reason why I ask is I do believe that injuries, or anything else for that matter, they happen for a reason. Now, when I ask people if they believe, there are really three camps. One is yes, absolutely. The other is no, it’s just an accident. Then there is that middle part, yeah, maybe, or yeah it’s karma. So it’s almost like blaming themselves for being bad people, or thinking something bad happened to them because they weren’t completely okay or good. But I don’t see it that way, and what you explained, it’s beautiful. Why do you think that some people heal from anything really easily, and others are just struggling and struggling and struggling?

13:11
Amy B. Scher:
So I think this is a little bit of a couple of things. One being, I believe that one of the main differences is somebody who has a lot of emotional trauma, or blocks, or stress that their body – I mean science has helped us understand now that your body is not in full healing mode. Your immune system is not at its best when you’re dealing with difficult emotions that you don’t know what to do with, or you’re suppressing them or you're so uptight because you’re a perfectionist. So I think there’s a little bit of that. I also think, and I think this is important for people to understand, that some of us just come into this world a little bit more of a sensitive soul, or we’re – our process is different. Like I remember I really question – there are people who contract Lyme disease, they take antibiotics and then they’re fine. Or I met people who had chronic, very chronic versions of the disease like I did, and then they found shots of Vitamin B12 just changed everything for them, or they started drinking green juice. That was like I’m not the person who ever has any life-changing thing by doing something like that. I remember really struggling with that, thinking like what is wrong with me. Even in my own my family, my grandfather was a Holocaust survivor and lived late into old age, basically, with not very many health or emotional challenges. I was like how can somebody that has an experience like that turn out fine and somebody like me, who grew up in a loving family. I mean things weren’t perfect, but I certainly had love. I was certainly taken care of. I was certainly nurtured. Why am I being so affected? But I think the answer is just some of us are just – that’s just our life path. So I think that’s really important. Because this whole kind of blame mentality is something that I think we take too seriously. Like at some point I really realized, like after I was very defensive about it and it’s not my fault, it’s not my fault, I sort of paused. I thought okay, it’s not my fault but if it was, like let’s just say it was, who cares? Like who cares? This doesn’t help. Like this whole fight about it’s not my fault and I’m being blamed, like that was so not self-serving. That was, in part, blocking my healing. So I think if it helps people to understand that some of us just have a harder time than others then it’s okay. Then we can move into doing what we can to move through that.

15:47
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes, it makes sense. With emotions, again, those who are really in tune with themselves and know what it might be there, or is triggering them, they know that something is happening. Now, I know that there are also people who think they don’t have any emotional trauma, or they actually don’t know about it. What do you suggest to those people who don’t know where to start with that?

16:17
Amy B. Scher:
Yeah. So I think the first thing, and this usually breaks things open for everybody, is to be really, really honest with yourself. I think people do know what their stuff is, but when you’ve spent a whole lifetime trying not to make a big deal about things you thought you shouldn’t make a big deal about, what happens is you become out of touch with how you really feel. I think that was true for me. Like I said, I grew up in a loving household. My parents were still married. I mean I certainly had things that weren’t perfect but like anybody in life. Like I was kind of always the easygoing one. I was the middle child. I was friendly and social and da-da-da-da. When I first looked, I thought well I don’t have anything. When I started being really, really honest with myself I was like but actually, I do have a lot of stuff. I’m really afraid to show my emotions. I’m not always the easygoing one on the inside but I am externally and there’s that disconnect there. I was always really worried about other people being upset. So I was a don’t rock the boat kind of person ever since I was little. I remember that when I was a really little kid I would just like panic if one of my parents was upset. So I think once I got honest I was like oh wow, I do kind of have a lot of stuff. And again, in a light-hearted – like I think taking ourselves in kind of a light way is really nice. In this lighthearted way I was like oh, I can kind of see it now. Like I’m really a perfectionist and a people pleaser and I don’t express my emotions and I don’t even know what to do with my emotions sometimes. I’m always trying on the outside to be a strong person. Like none of these things are good for your nervous system or your immune system. In my approach that I teach in my books and my online programs, I do teach a way to tap into the subconscious mind to figure out exactly what traumas or experiences from the past could be stressing your immuno-nervous systems. There’s a specific way to do it, but generally speaking, for anybody right now that doesn’t even want to go further at the moment and learn anything, just to be open minded. You don’t have to talk to anybody about it. You don’t have to admit to anybody about it. But are there some things you haven’t been being honest with yourself about. I would be shocked if there was anybody who couldn’t find a thing or two! Then think about how that’s affected you.

18:48
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes, it makes sense. Since you also mentioned your book and what you’re teaching in it, a couple of years ago I came across your book and started reading it. Back then, I had some hip problems. Pain in my hip. So I did the different things that you are describing from muscle testing to everything else, and I got the answer, my body was telling me what it is, but do you know what I did?

19:20
Amy B. Scher:
What?

19:20
Dr. Maya Novak:
I said no, that’s not it, that’s not the reason! It took me more than half a year, or maybe even approaching one year. I did the whole circle round to come back to that first answer that my body gave me.

19:39
Amy B. Scher:
Yeah, and the reason – and you are not an anomaly. People do that. The interesting thing is that people are not always in touch with what experiences from their past sort of traumatize them or are still stuck in their body because we mentally judge if something should have upset us or not. A lot of us grew up being told don’t worry, it’ll be okay, or just kind of suck it up and move on, or don’t be upset this person had something worse happen. So what happens is when we experience something and it upsets us, we talk ourselves out of it very quickly, or we compare it to something else that’s happened or somebody else who has experienced something. With really big obvious traumas like a loss of a family member, or an accident, or something like that, we tend to feel better about making a big deal about it because people understand it. It makes sense. Of course, you’d be upset if you had a loss in your family or you got in an accident or somebody mistreated you or x, y or z. But for things that we talk ourselves out of, those are the things that get stuck because don’t admit to them, we talk ourselves out of them. We don’t express them and release them from the body. So I work mostly with people with chronic illness and injuries where when somebody sometime has been working on things for 20 years to heal. When we identify what the thing is that’s stuck, that’s preventing them from healing, it is more often than not something that they go I can’t, and I would have never even remembered that unless intuitively I picked it up. So it’s something like something somebody said to you on the playground in second grade or the time your mom didn’t have time to look at your artwork from fifth grade. It’s the things that seem silly, but the reason that they get stuck is because we don’t actually acknowledge them and process them.

21:42
Dr. Maya Novak:
Thank you, Amy, for sharing that because it’s common that people are minimizing their trauma. It’s always a comparison. It’s as if something horrible or more horrible happened to some other person, therefore I shouldn’t be complaining here. It’s really – it doesn’t matter how big the trauma is – it’s your personal trauma, right.

22:05
Amy B. Scher:
Yes.

22:05
Dr. Maya Novak:
So it’s what affects you, and affected you. So it doesn’t matter even if the big trauma was doing something to your nail, it’s like oh my goodness, my nail is now gone. It was a traumatic experience for you. Would you agree with that?

22:21
Amy B. Scher:
Yes, and I do talk about in my books how being traumatized is different from – you can be traumatized by anything. Sometimes I even try to steer away from the word trauma because we think of such big life events. But if we think about trauma in terms of experiences that traumatized us, it’s a little bit easier to see. For example, I didn’t get sick until I was in my early 20s but a lot of what I cleared emotionally from myself was from age two, which I identified through muscle testing. At age two, I couldn’t think of much, but my brother was born and that, the way that I perceived that at two years old and the way that I felt got stuck in my body. That’s a happy time in the family, typically, when a new baby is born and all of that. But for me, that didn’t – whatever, however, I experienced that was not positive – was not completely positive for me and part of that got stuck and that was affecting my immune system. Now, that’s not anything I would ever resonate with. Sometimes I tell people it’s not what happened to you, it’s the capacity you have to process it at the age you were when it happened. So like looking back as an adult and judging your childhood experiences leaves you in a situation where you were going oh that couldn’t be, because where you are now as an evolved adult is probably even different from where you were ten years ago. So you just have to kind of look at who you were at the time, and how that might have affected that younger you – even if the younger you was just five years ago. We do, we have a different capacity to deal with it at different ages.

24:05
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes, especially because we are evolving all the time, or mostly we are evolving all the time. So how we were five years ago, we absolutely are not the same person now. Yes, it makes sense.

24:19
Amy B. Scher:
Yes.

24:19
Dr. Maya Novak:
So with healing usually comes frustration, and especially with long-term healing. Many times we describe this as fighting something, or fighting the pain that comes with injuries. Can you talk a bit about how fighting something affects our healing?

24:40
Amy B. Scher:
Yes. Thank you for asking that. I don’t think anyone’s ever asked me that, and that’s such a great point to bring up. I went through this with Lyme disease, I was always – and our culture talks about fighting a disease, battling this and it’s hard because we start to get into that fighting mentality. With Lyme disease, I remember at some point I was fighting the bacteria, trying to kill it, trying to eradicate it, trying to beat it – all of these things. My doctors used that language too. At some point, I realized wait a second, this bacteria – and this goes for this injury, or this illness, or whatever – is inside my body. If I’m throwing a fight inside my body, that energy is also affecting all my healthy cells and the rest of me. That was a huge turning point for me to realize that I can’t hate and beat and berate and be mad something inside of me and still heal. So that energy, even though you may be angry or frustrated, there are tools – and I talk about them in my books – but there are tools to release that frustration and that energy and that anger so that you aren’t throwing it back into your body. Because a body that’s beat up on and you’re frustrated with it and you’re mad, a body like that doesn’t heal. That’s not a good healing environment. I always tell people not to deny their emotions. From time to time, you’re going to feel frustrated. You’re going to feel annoyed. You’re going to feel aargh I’m so sick of this. Those temporary thoughts and feelings don’t do anything. It’s when the overarching theme becomes I’m angry all the time. I’m fighting this battle. It’s more like I don’t want people to be scared of what are a couple of negative thoughts or whatever, those are all okay. But as a whole, you should aim for feeling like you’re supporting your body so that it can be bigger and stronger and more balanced than the thing that we’re trying to heal.

26:42
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes. It makes sense. You mentioned muscle testing a couple of times before, and I mentioned it as well as one of the techniques that you are using. Can you explain what this is and how it works?

26:55
Amy B. Scher:
Sure.

26:58
Dr. Maya Novak:
We'll continue in just a moment. I wanted to quickly jump in for two things. First, thank you for tuning in. And second, I’m sure you have at least one friend, colleague, or family member who would very much appreciate this episode. So share it with them and help us spread the word. Now let’s continue…

27:19
Amy B. Scher:
Muscle testing is a way to use the response of the muscles in your body to tap into your subconscious mind and get answers from the subconscious mind. In one of my books I kind of have a list of questions in the chapter that says you’re probably wondering what the heck caused this, why am I not healing, you’re probably going over those questions all the time in your head. Muscle testing allows us to ask those questions or direct those questions directly to the subconscious mind, which has all the answers locked inside. It’s a process of learning how to read the different responses in your muscles after asking a question about what you want the answer for. It really can help you sort of hone in on experiences from the past, and specific ages where things happen. Like I found that energy from age two, you found something your hip. If there’s energy around other people you need to clear like past traumas or just experiences with other people. It can help you identify where in your body energy is stuck. Sometimes pain is referred, which means it’s happening under your left rib cage, but you’re feeling it on your left shoulder blade. The way that energy works, energetically different organs, muscles, and glands are connected to each other energetically. This is sort of a premise of traditional Chinese medicine. There are different energy pathways and if energy is blocked anywhere on that pathway, it can affect anywhere in the body along that pathway. So you can use muscle testing to figure out where energy is blocked, what you need to clear, and also which techniques would help you clear it. Your subconscious mind has all these cool answers, it’s just we’re usually kind of locked out of that. So that’s a real help. That was kind of a groundbreaking thing for me because I was constantly why don’t I feel good, what should I do, da-da-da-da. This really helped me identify where the emotional blocks were and what to do about that.

29:22
Dr. Maya Novak:
Can you talk a bit about the subconscious mind and why it is such an important part of the healing journey?

29:31
Amy B. Scher:
Yeah. The subconscious mind, like I mentioned, has all of this information or answers locked in it. A lot of times we are unknowingly, subconsciously, thinking things or believing things that are not in alignment with our healing. For instance, when I was healing from Lyme disease and autoimmune and all of this, I thought like oh, I want to heal. I’m in alignment with healing. I’m doing all of these things to heal. But when I learned about muscle testing and about the subconscious mind and that we can believe things that aren’t exactly true because of lessons we’ve learned in our lives that we sort of interpreted or misinterpreted, I found out that I was scared to heal. That while I was doing all of these things to heal, there was part of me that did not want to heal because I felt like because I took everything on because I was such a perfectionist and a people pleaser, there was actually a part of me that felt like being sick was easier. Being stuck in bed at home was easier than living life. It’s funny because to this day I still think that’s true. It doesn’t affect me, but I always tell my clients in a loving light-hearted way, like oh my gosh, being healthy, like you have to deal with all this stuff. When I was in bed, all of my – everybody excused me for everything and I excused myself from things. I’ve had to learn through releasing this old energy that it’s okay to be out in the world and not be expected to be perfect, that I can be out in the world and sometimes people will be upset with me, and that will be okay. So I had to learn that being healthy could be as safe emotionally as being sick and locked in my room in my bed where nothing could really affect me. So beliefs like I’m not good enough. I don’t deserve to feel good. If I’m not perfect people won’t love me. All of those things can sort of just go on in the background without you really knowing and affect how you are healing from an injury, or if you are healing from an injury. So imagine you’re in bed and not healing and you’re trying and trying and trying, but part of you is thinking well if I heal from this injury, I’m going to have to go back to work. I don’t know any other but to get out of this work that doesn’t feel good to me except to be sick, or injured and not go to work. Again, this is all subconscious, there’s no reason to blame yourself. Our subconscious are crazy silly kind of entities that do their own thing, but these things I’ve seen make huge differences when cleared for people in terms of their recovery.

32:13
Dr. Maya Novak:
Thank you for sharing that. It’s true, it just doesn’t make sense what is often happening in our subconscious minds. So talking about actually not wanting to get better, it can be perceived like of course I want to get better.

32:29
Amy B. Scher:
Yeah.

32:29
Dr. Maya Novak:
I’m sick of this frustration and anger and everything, of course, I want to get better. But actually, what is happening behind it, what we are actually not aware of, it can be a completely different story.

32:41
Amy B. Scher:
Yeah, and it’s like kind of two parts of you. One that’s trying to move forward, and the other part, your subconscious, that’s putting the brakes on. So I always say look, we have to make the conscious and the subconscious mind be a friend to each other and work together. That’s when we see big strides in healing. When everybody’s on board with the same thing and when we’ve cleared some of those emotional blocks or fears around whatever would happen if you healed. We sometimes call it a downside to healing, or an upside to being sick. But usually, you can kind of, if you stretch your imagination, go okay. I have people ask the question if there was some silly reason or crazy reason my body didn’t want to heal, what would it be? Usually, your brain will push forward some crazy silly thing that you’re like oh my gosh, but it makes sense, it does.

33:29
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes, it makes sense, absolutely. So what would you say to someone who is – let’s say that they had an accident a year, or two years ago, and they healed completely okay, but now a year later, or two years later, the pain – or something else -came back? Was there something that wasn’t released in that traumatic experience with the accident, or can it be something else?

34:01
Amy B. Scher:
It could be both and this is exactly what happened to me was that I sort of forced my healing with this stem cell treatment, and then after a year everything started to come. I think there is a couple of reasons that could be. One, I think something maybe wasn’t all the way healed. But it also could be that that area – and I don’t like to call it the weakest link – but we all have areas in our body where things show up. Sometimes when we’ve had an injury in an area, that’s where a new thing will show up. A new emotional energy. Pain was my number one symptom when I was sick. I had a lot of nerve damage and pain – I always feel like our body is speaking to us through symptoms. Symptoms are important messages from your body. For me, I have never worked – and I have worked with thousands of clients now – I have never worked with a client that had pain that didn’t have some belief that they deserved pain because they weren’t good enough or some pattern of beating themselves up. If you are hard on yourself, if you’re a perfectionist, if you never let yourself off the hook, if you have a lot of guilt, if you turn on yourself, that translates to physical pain. Because if we’re looking at the message from the body, what is the message? I mean pain is the message for we need to be punished. Punishment and pain are sort of parallel in this crazy universe of our body. So turning on yourself and putting that I’m not good enough, or I should have done this, or I should have done that – and again, once in a while thinking that, no problem. Don’t be scared of your thoughts. Don’t be scared of your emotions. But the overall unhealthy pattern of constantly blaming yourself, constantly beating yourself up, constantly telling yourself you’re stupid, you’re not good enough, you have done this, da-da-da-da – that hurts the body. That’s painful. That’s like if somebody else told you those things all of the time. Your nervous system - which is very linked into pain signals in your body – your nervous system gets really stressed and wound up and then all of these pain signals starting going off and causing inflammation. I mean there’s so many reasons. But I would say if you’re somebody who is experiencing pain, look at how you’re treating yourself. Look at what pain you’re internalizing.

36:16
Dr. Maya Novak:
So if we go back slightly to muscle testing that you explained, is this something that we can do on our own? Or is it better to work with someone who has tons of experience, like yourself?

36:31
Amy B. Scher:
I think it’s somebody everybody can do on their own. In fact, I find that if you’re somebody who has been to a lot of practitioners, and a lot of people to help, it can actually be a healing modality in and of itself to work on yourself, to help yourself. Because what happens is we become – we feel very disempowered and helpless and panicked that nobody can help us. When we turn inward and learn that there are the things we can do to help ourselves, and when these connects start to happen about like oh yeah, I have this pattern and let me see what I can do about it and let me test this. That can instantly soothe the nervous system because now you feel empowered. You feel in control. You feel like there’s something you can do to help yourself. Like you’re safe in your own hands versus relying on will this person return my call, or can I get an appointment, or can I afford it, or whatever it may be. So while it’s always beneficial if you feel like you need support to get that support, I don’t want - my techniques are the ones that I used to heal myself – like my book title Heal Yourself When No One Else Can. You can do them all on your own. I do work with people who need a little support, or let me help you figure this out and then I kind of give them a list of do this with this technique, and then come back and we’ll figure it out again. But for the majority of it, I feel like it’s not only possible but beneficial for people to do on their own. I wrote my books in the vein of you can heal yourself when no one else can. That doesn’t mean you don’t need or might not need a little support. But the bulk of healing, I feel that comes from the inside and even if I wanted to, I couldn’t do that for somebody else.

38:10
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes, and the important thing is when you get the answer, don’t push it aside. Listen to that.

38:16
Amy B. Scher:
Listen.

38:17
Dr. Maya Novak:
Listen to that message.

38:20
Amy B. Scher:
Yes.

38:20
Dr. Maya Novak:
What are some other ways how we connect with our subconscious mind to get those answers?

38:27
Amy B. Scher:
So muscle testing is my favorite one, but I also often tell people just to close their eyes, ask a question and ask for their subconscious mind to push forward the message. A lot of times people can communicate with their subconscious mind that way. I can do that if sit quietly, and if I don’t question the answer it’s actually quite accurate. Some people will think I don’t know, am I just making that up? Or what if that answer is just coming from me – it is like it is coming from you, it’s just a different part of you. So what I would do is just approach communicating with the subconscious mind as kind of in a curious way. I have strict rules in my book and guidelines, like don’t ever test for a disease. It doesn’t work for things like that. Don’t ever try to find out if something happened in your childhood that you don’t remember. We’re essentially testing for what the body resonates with, not what the truth is if that makes sense. We talked a little bit about beliefs that are not true. So you believe that you’re stupid. That doesn’t mean you are stupid. That means you believe it and you need to let it go. So my use of muscle testing is very confined to testing what’s stuck in your body, what you believe, not necessarily what’s the truth and clearing it out. It’s pretty accurate because most of us don’t have beliefs about – when you’re testing for an age – like people will say to me how do you know if that age is right. I say, probably because you didn’t believe it. Like it didn’t make sense. When things don’t make sense, you really know it’s just the information coming up. Testing for ages is pretty arbitrary like you won’t care one way or another what comes up. But with testing for beliefs, you have to be really careful. So I always tell people not to test for I have x disease because you could be testing your belief about if you have that disease. So it’s only for identifying what emotional energy your body resonates with an going from there. Muscle testing is my favorite way because I feel like it just gets the things you wouldn’t think of, but then also just communicating and asking the subconscious mind what do I need to know to help me heal, or what could I clear, what emotional pattern could I work on. I actually have a lot of questions in my books about what you can ask through muscle testing. If you don’t want to use muscle testing for some reason, you can just use those same questions, and just ask your subconscious mind and see what the response is. But sort of approaching it with curiosity is always the best way to do it.

40:56
Dr. Maya Novak:
Mm-mm. So going towards solutions, or how to do, or what to do. One of your techniques that I love is the sweep technique.

41:07
Amy B. Scher:
Yes.

41:07
Dr. Maya Novak:
Is it possible to do it right now?

41:10
Amy B. Scher:
Sure, let’s do it. So the sweep technique is a very specific script that I wrote and it’s like sweeping, like sweeping with a broom to help sweep old energy out of the subconscious mind. This can be beliefs, this can be trauma, or emotions, or whatever it may be. One of the things that I feel like is really important to clear, and I talk about this in my work, is the belief that I can’t heal. Because after we’ve struggled with an injury or an illness for long enough, there’s a part of us that starts to wonder if we can’t heal. So maybe we should the sweep to clear out that old energy about I can’t heal because remember we talked about we have to be on board with healing. What if you’re doing all these things to heal, but deep down at your core you really don’t even believe you can do it. That’s going to cause that discrepancy that may block or slow your healing. So let’s do it for that. Does that sound good?

42:07
Dr. Maya Novak:
Absolutely.

42:08
Amy B. Scher:
This is in my books. I’m going to read it to you and go through, but I want everybody to know this something you can do totally by yourself, no experience necessary. You essentially just read the script. So if you just put your hands over your heart, close your eyes, take a big deep breath and repeat after me. Even though …
I have this belief
That I can’t heal
Or maybe something’s wrong with me
I acknowledge it’s no longer working for me
I give my subconscious
Full permission
To help me clear it
From all of my cells
In all of my body
Permanently and completely
I am now free
To thank this old belief
For serving me in the past
When maybe I really needed it for some reason
I am now free
To release all resistances
To letting it go
I am now free
To release all ideas
That I need this injury
In order to stay safe
I am now free
To release all ideas
That I need it for any other reason
I am now free
To release all feelings
That I don’t deserve to let go of
This injury
I am now free
To release all conscious
And subconscious causes
I am now free
To release all harmful patterns
Emotions and memories
Connected to it
I am now free
To release all generational energy
Keeping it stuck
All of my being
Is healing and clearing this energy now
Including any stress response
Stored in my cells
Healing, healing, healing
Clearing, clearing, clearing
It is now time to install
The new belief
I can heal
I can heal
Installing, installing, installing
And so it is done.

46:11
Amy B. Scher:
Okay. Take a big deep breath. That’s the sweep technique, and the interesting thing about that one is it seems so simple, but sometimes people either fall – like not asleep, but kind of nod off in that one, or lose where they are in like they’re listening to me and they’re trying to repeat, but they kind of lose it. Because what’s happening – and that’s really typical, even when I do it and I wrote it, that happens to me. What were the words, which is so funny because I know them? What happens is we’re really working on the subconscious mind. So your conscious mind is like either thinking about other things or not paying attention or nodding off. Like we’re really going deep into the roots and so a lot of people can kind of get disoriented in the process. But it’s going to a deep place and sweeping those old beliefs out.

46:59
Dr. Maya Novak:
I love this technique. It’s really powerful and the more you listen to this – this is how I feel about this technique – it’s not jsut one time, like you do it one time and then that’s it. It’s repeating the process. Is that correct?

47:15
Amy B. Scher:
Yes, that’s correct. There are certain things where you only need to do if you find an experience from your past and you work through it using the techniques in the book, you only need to do that once. But for something like a belief, I’ll say read it a couple of times, see you how you feel. You can then muscle test again to see if it’s all gone. There are different ways to figure out how many times you need to do it. But for something like a deep-seated belief like I can’t heal, or I deserve to be in pain, or I’m not good enough, or whatever it may be, definitely I say repeating it a few times is beneficial.

47:49
Dr. Maya Novak:
Mm-mm. So what is your number advice that you would give someone who is now injured and is in this healing journey?

44:58
Amy B. Scher:
What I wish I knew was to be lighter on myself. I feel like things took me so much longer because when I was having a tough time, I added a bunch of like guilt and self-berating and da-da-da-da on top. I can’t remember the exact quote, but Ram Dass, who is an amazing spiritual teacher and guru has a quote about it’s kind of not the thought or the thing that happens, but all the BS we put on top of that complicates it. I really feel like looking back at those times when I was really having a hard time, if I would have just let myself okay, not get out of bed that day, not be able to take a shower for myself, whatever it was versus having all of that emotion and negative self-talk and guilt on top of it. I think that I would have healed a lot faster. So the techniques that I teach in the book, like emotional freedom technique, chakra tapping, thymus tapping. There are many techniques in the book that help us release the emotions we’re feeling now just to put our body in a better place, which not only helps you feel better in the moment when you don’t have guilt and all the negative self-talk but also really helps your body heal faster. So that’s what I want to tell everybody, is don’t add stuff to your stuff!

49:17
Dr. Maya Novak:
So was there a moment in your healing journey when you actually lost hope, and thought that it’s not going to happen?

49:27
Amy B. Scher:
All of the time. I mean I was so sick for 10 years. I went to the best doctors. I think I temporarily lost hope and faith. It’s funny, I have – most of my books are self-help books – but then last year I wrote a memoir, which is just my personal story. What I explain in it is that with hope and faith you lose them, but they come back when you need them the most. So I remember feeling like all hope was lost, nothing’s working, and then just when I would hit the lowest of the lowest point, faith would return and I would get like another small gust of just faith or hope to like bring me to the next place. So I think that that’s also somewhere where we need to be gentle with ourselves. Especially for people are learning about how to change their thoughts and emotions and be more positive. Sometimes you’re just going to feel terrible, and that’s okay. A lot of people get into affirmations and the law of attraction. These really great principles that can help us, but then take them too seriously and then they can make you really nervous that every negative thought or emotion. Trust me, I have all kinds of negative thoughts and emotions and that’s not the majority of how I feel the majority of the time, but I have them and they’re okay. They don’t hold you back. You’re not going to be struck down by something terrible if you worry about a little bit. Those are human emotions. So I think that’s an important thing to remember, is that when do have those moments – my mom calls them a pity party – just feel bad for yourself for a little while, eat ice cream, do whatever you have to do, have a pity party. But when we have that pity party temporarily it does benefit our greater good because we can move through those emotions.

51:21
Dr. Maya Novak:
But it’s probably very important that we don’t stay in that pity party. So …

51:26
Amy B. Scher:
That is the key. It has to be a very short, short party.

51:31
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes! Because with losing hope, I know that now there are people listening who are losing hope and maybe they’ve been in this state for really long periods of time.

51:45
Amy B. Scher:
Yes.

51:45
Dr. Maya Novak:
What would you say to that person who is losing hope and who feels like they don’t see the light at the end of this tunnel.

51:53
Amy B. Scher:
Yeah, so two things. One, I would say that you rarely see a light before it comes. I remember that I had one of the worst – physically worst months of my life before the month that I turned a corner and healed completely. I was like this never going away. This is the worst. I am so much worse this month than I was last month, I’m going in the wrong direction. It was that very next month where things changed. It was like thank goodness I didn’t give up, it was just around the corner, I couldn’t see it. And you hear that from a lot of people. It’s just all of what you’re working toward may not be showing up incrementally, but at the end, your healing will come. So that’s one, it’s just to know that you can’t see what’s about to happen, and that was so true for me. The other thing is that when you’re feeling like that, it’s important to use techniques to clear that feeling, to feel relief in the moment. So I really like EFT or Emotional Freedom Technique, which is tapping on different points and talking about how disgusted and frustrated you feel. I teach that in my books. I also teach – I have a free YouTube video that teaches that. It’s 20 minutes on how to use it. I have tons of techniques that just not only help you heal overall but help you feel better in the moment. Because when you’re feeling hopeless it’s really, really hard to even like sort of inch into any kind of positive thinking that will then help support your body. So using techniques in the moment just to feel better in the moment is really helpful. If you can clear – I feel like either positive or negative emotion is sort of like a train that takes off. If you can get yourself to feel even a little bit of relief or positive emotion you can kind of turn around the negative emotion train. So you don’t need to go from – I’ve heard of techniques that go from your sick and hopeless and I remember listening to things that were like be grateful for the house you have, be grateful for the sunshine, and it’s like I can’t even move, honestly. I’m not grateful for anything right now. But one trick I learned was to find the thought that’s just a little less miserable than the one you’re thinking. So what I would do is – my body would be in seething pain, I was on narcotic pain pills, nothing was working, I would end up in the hospital – and what I would think was at least my pinky toe doesn’t hurt. Like I would try to make a joke about it, or like at least I’m home feeling miserable instead of the hospital feeling miserable where I was last week. So you don’t try to jump from feeling the worst you’ve ever felt to trying to be grateful for the sunshine. It’s too far of a stretch. What you try to do is you inch your way towards feeling better, which is just find the next or least miserable thought or emotion you can cling onto. You kind of go slowly, but it really, really worked for me to turn things around.

54:53
Dr. Maya Novak:
I love this technique, and I’m using it for myself. A lot of the times it’s almost like building a ladder for yourself.

55:00
Amy B. Scher:
Yes.

55:01
Dr. Maya Novak:
So you are climbing up slowl. It’s not like to jump up 10 meters, because you can’t. So it’s just climbing slowly, slowly, slowly.

55:13
Amy B. Scher:
Yes, it’s so much easier because when you’re in that bad place it’s like don’t – I can’t stretch too far. Our minds don’t do it. We don’t feel good, we’re upset, we’re hopeless and all of those things. It’s so hard to, yeah, jump to the top of the ladder. I like how you say that.

55:30
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes, and probably that’s your experience with clients as well. I know that for my clients, even though some have amazing support at home with friends, but it’s just that jump with people around them are saying well, just be better, or feel better, or …

55:47
Amy B. Scher:
Go for a walk; take some deep breaths, yeah.

55:51
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes.

55:52
Amy B. Scher:
Yes, I know all of those things and it just doesn’t help. They’re trying to help, but it just doesn’t help.

55:56
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes, yes. So how do you see the future of healing - from injuries, we’re talking specifically about injuries – but in general, healing because now are we are, at least that’s sort of how I see it in theory, we are slowly turning to more holistic.

56:15
Amy B. Scher:
Yes.

56:15
Dr. Maya Novak:
It's not just going to the doctor and then waiting and hoping, finger’s crossed, that everything is going to be okay. How do you see the future of that?

56:24
Amy B. Scher:
So I think things are moving major – I mean the majority of referrals that I get with clients are from doctors and practitioners, which is amazing because years and years ago when I was sick nobody brought this stuff up to me. But even like the major hospitals now – I’ve even – here in New York one of the major hospital networks brought me in to work with their patients. So this idea of the mind-body-connection and a lot of the emerging science behind it has really helped us move in the right direction. I think that we’re seeing that the best of healing comes from integrating all the things that feel good for us. Like maybe you want to go to a regular MD for support, but then also work on the emotional aspect and the nutrition and all of that. It’s like whatever you feel – whatever you resonate with most will benefit your body the most. I feel like even sort of the traditional doctors that maybe didn’t get it 10 years ago are seeing a change and thank goodness. I think it’s from the patients coming in and demanding that their doctors be open to and listen to other aspects of healing from injury aside from just fixing the body part. I think that patients are really leading the way in teaching their doctors and doctors are more open than they’ve ever been, I think. It’s all very positive and hopeful.

57:51
Dr. Maya Novak:
Very exciting times.

57:52
Amy B. Scher:
Yes.

57:52
Dr. Maya Novak:
Yes. I do have one last question. It’s a bit more of a fun question, and that is if you were stuck on a desert island with an injury and you could bring only one thing that would help you heal amazingly well, what would that be?

58:08
Amy B. Scher:
That is a fun question, and you might be asking the wrong person about bringing a tool because what I learned through all my techniques is I just need to have my hands or my thoughts. So I don’t know if there’s any one thing I would bring. I’m a writer. I would probably bring my computer if that’s a thing because I feel like that writing – I think we all have some creative outlet that helps us, and for me, that’s writing. I don’t know – I think that’s probably what I would do. One thing that I really did learn, and this kind of plays into this question, is that when you’re healing it’s really important to remember that it’s still okay to have fun or enjoy things because that’s also very, very healing. So if it’s eating the cookie when maybe sugar is not the best thing for inflammation, or it’s doing something fun instead of resting once in a while or whatever. So I don’t know what I would bring, but I would say maybe we should all bring a fun thing to the island so we can offset some of this heavy healing energy.

59:08
Dr. Maya Novak:
Awesome. Amy, where can people find more about you?

59:12
Amy B. Scher:
People can find more about me on my website http://www.amybsher.com. I’m also on YouTube with lots of videos, and then I have few books, primarily my best-seller that’s now been translated into, I think, 13 languages How to Heal Yourself When No One Else Can and people can learn all of the techniques we talked about in that book.

59:37
Dr. Maya Novak:
Awesome. Amy, thank you so much for being here, and for sharing your knowledge and your expertise, thank you.

59:44
Amy B. Scher:
Thank you. Of course, thank you for having me.

59:47
Dr. Maya Novak:
Thank you for tuning into another episode with Amy B Scher. If you haven’t done it yet, subscribe to the podcast on whatever platform you’re using to tune in. Of course, also remember to share this episode with your loved ones and help them out. To access show notes, links, and transcript, of today’s talk go to mayanovak.com/podcast. To learn more about The Mindful Injury Recovery Method visit my website mayanovak.com and find my book Heal Beyond Expectations on Amazon. Until next time – keep evolving, blooming, and healing.

Love and gratitude xx
Dr. Maya

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